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SB 618 on its way to Gov. for signature

SB 618—the bill to lift the cap on charter schools—is on its way to Gov. Snyder for signature and it is no gift for public education or the students of Michigan.  The bill, with changes, passed the House last night on a 58-49 vote, and today with the Senate’s concurrence, the bill heads to the Governor who is expected to sign the bill into law.

Charter school cap and PAC payroll deduction prohibition on legislative agenda this week

While it seems every week has been a crucial legislative week for education, this next to the last week of session before the holiday break may see some major bills move out of committee or out of chamber.

President Cook reaffirms MEA's position on SB 618 with state reps

In a letter to state representatives, President Steve Cook is urging them to vote “no” on SB 618, the legislation that lifts the cap on charter schools.

Emails expose Mackinac Center’s true purpose

State representative gets lobbying email from Center’s legislative analyst, who wants “no more MEA”

Supreme Court finds only some parts of pension tax unconstitutional

The Michigan Supreme Court has ruled that Gov. Snyder and the Republican-led Legislature could apply the state’s personal income tax to senior’s pension income. However, the court also ruled that basing exemptions on an individual’s wealth is unconstitutional since it could be considered a graduated tax, which is banned under the state constitution.

Districts receiving "best practices" payments

Because they met four out of five of Gov. Snyder's "best practices," 177 school districts across the state were approved for an additional $100 per student in state aid designated as "incentive funds." Those districts began receiving installment payments on Oct. 20.

House will change Senate's anti-bullying bill

Senate Minority Floor Leader Gretchen Whitmer’s D-East Lansing) passionate speech against SB 137 went viral on YouTube with more than 300,000 hits.

Speak up at MDE hearings on teacher certification

There are still opportunities to make your voice heard at MDE hearings on teacher certification changes. Don't be dissuaded by State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan's assurance that teachers won't lose their certification if they don't receive three consecutive evaluation ratings of "effective" or "highly effective." The issue is still not resolved and this is our chance to change the direction of the conversation. MEA has provided a hearing schedule and talking points.

Flanagan won't make teacher certification dependent on evaluations

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Mike Flanagan is now backtracking on some aspects of the administrative rule changes for teacher certification issued last month.

Citing his position as final authority, Flanagan is now assuring teachers that the new rule stripping teachers of their certification if they did not receive three consecutive evaluation ratings of “highly effective” or “effective” will be removed.

No sound rationale for ban on union dues deduction

In a brief 15-minute meeting today, the Senate Reforms, Restructuring and Reinventing Committee heard testimony on HB 4929 by its sponsor, Rep. Joe Haveman (R-Holland). The bill would prohibit the payroll deduction of union dues from an employee's paycheck. SB 636, a similar bill sponsored by Sen. Arlan Meekhof (R-West Olive) is also being considered by the Committee.

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