Dues Information

 

2013-14 MEA/NEA Dues


2013-2014 MEA Dues breakdown (PDF)

 

How are MEA dues determined?

MEA dues are set by delegates to the MEA Representative Assembly in conjunction with adoption of the MEA budget.

Per MEA governance documents, the MEA active membership fee “shall be one and one-half percent (1.5%) of each member’s contractual salary/wage for the prior year ending June 30 earned for work in a bargaining unit represented by MEA or one of its affiliates provided that the active membership fee shall not exceed six hundred forty dollars ($640). 

It is important to note that the Representative Assembly has the authority to set a new percentage and cap (maximum dues) each year at its spring meeting.

How are NEA dues determined?

NEA dues are set by national level governance documents.

Per the NEA Bylaws, the NEA full-time membership fee shall be ".00225 times the national average annual salary of classroom teachers in the public elementary and secondary schools (rounded to the nearest dollar) plus .00055 of the national average annual salary of classroom teachers in the public elementary and secondary schools (rounded to the nearest dollar) to be allocated to the UniServ grants according to the policy of the NEA Board of Directors." The dues are based on prior year salary data.

Dues for ESP members are determined based upon the national average annual salary of school employees in educational support positions, but in no event shall the dues be less than one-half the active dues for classroom teachers.

How much of my dues go to political candidates?

None!  State and federal campaign finance law states that we are not allowed to contribute dues money to political candidates – so we don’t!  Only voluntary contributions to the MEA Political Action Committee (MEA-PAC) or the NEA Fund for Children and Public education can be used for that purpose at the state and federal level, respectively.  However, every decision affecting public education is made by an elected politician at some level (local, state or federal).  As such, dues dollars can be and are used to lobby lawmakers and communicate about important education issues with the public.